Posts Tagged ‘learning’

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What Kind of Business Training is Best for You?

August 19, 2008

While the content should be something that will enhance your business and help you increase your revenue, skills or happiness; the way in which you learn should help you determine how those skills are best processed by you.

Essentially there are 3 different Learning modalities:

Visual – You find writing things down, or highlighting them to help you best to recall the information.  Diagrams, photos, video or even cards with notes on them – remember flash cards in math?  All of those are helpful for those that process things visually.

Auditory – You learn best by closing your eyes, blocking out the world and listening.  Word Association is an effective tool that you use to remember things.  Tapes and teleconferences are fabulous ways for you to increase you business acumen.

Kinesthetic – You learn best by jumping in and doing it.  You are the one that glosses over directions and fiddles around with things until you know how to do it.  Lessons that include games, role-playing and props (or physical examples of something you can touch) make a much bigger impression on you.

Most people do not have just one modality.  I learn best kinesthetically, but I also learn well visually.  Sitting still through a lecture or teleseminar is difficult for me, no matter how interesting the subject matter.  To counteract this tendency for my mind to wander in situations such as teleseminars, I tend to doodle about what the person is speaking about or take notes.  If the speaker is referencing things from the web I will bring them up on my computer.  I do have to make an effort not to become too involved with whatever is on the web so I tune out the speaker.  I know the point of my doodling or surfing the web is to keep my mind engaged on what the speaker is saying.

The most important thing to do is think about the ways you process information best and then choose the classes or lessons that work with that modality.  If there is a class or seminar that you want to be involved in that is not your strength, think of ways to incorporate your learning modality.  Someone who is auditory might want to record a seminar to listen to later.  Someone who is visual might choose to take notes and go over them with a highlighter later.  A kinesthetic person would choose to jump in and try out whatever it is they are learning to see how it feels.

Play to your strengths, while still being aware of your weaknesses.